Wall Street Journal Redesign

I had a hard time narrowing down what I think the best-designed site on the web is, so I picked my favorite recent redesign. The Wall Street Journal recently announced their redesign and even dedicated a page to guiding you through the new site.

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I have always enjoyed how the Wall Street Journal has displayed their plethora of information, but now I think they have only enhanced it. One could easily design a cluttered, overwhelming site with all the information that the Wall Street Journal possess yet they have always been able to create a very elegant and sleek design in my opinion (I know others probably disagree).

In their redesign they have created a seamless design that is replicated across devices, which I think is important for any brand image. Giving visitors consistent experiences regardless of device on each of their visits, puts their minds at ease and helps create brand loyalty.

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The Wall Street Journal stressed in their redesign that it would allow for “multiple ways to tell a story.” I think this really ties back into the idea that they are probably various reasons someone would visit the Wall Street Journal given the wide range of news that they cover. I think there are two new features in their redesign that really illustrate this idea. One is the expandable market data. Historically Wall Street Journal has been known for their expertise on all the happenings on Wall Street and is probably one of the main reasons that visitors enter the site. I think this is an excellent way of allowing this to be readily available, but not intrusive to other visitors who are not looking for market data.

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The second feature that I really enjoy was their new search feature. It doesn’t limit the visitor to just searching for a news story, but also quotes, companies, etc. allowing anyone who is coming in with a specific purpose to avoid any of the clutter that they don’t find relevant on the front page allow to just search and find what they are looking for.

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Any thoughts on the WSJ redesign?

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2 thoughts on “Wall Street Journal Redesign

  1. The Wall Street Journal has a classic design, but the only aspect of the design that I dislike is that the site looks cluttered. There are headlines throughout the main page of the site, and the colors seem to blend together. I had trouble finding content that stood out to me that I wanted to read, and the home page had a large amount of material on it. The scrolling went on forever! I eventually lost interest, and because of that, I didn’t click on any content.

    That being said, I still feel that the design of the site fits the Wall Street Journal’s personality. It’s an extremely serious paper, and it has a professional audience. The design of the site serves these traits, and this design has helped the paper maintain its prominence.

    The new design is definitely more modern in appearance, and I’m interested to see if the new design will bring more readers to the site. The Wall Street Journal is playing on the trend of scrolling, and I’ll admit that I like their use of white space. To me, the new design reminds me of a newspaper, and even though I have some issues with the new design, I think it add a new modern look to the Wall Street Journal.

    –Natasha Brewer
    4-23-15

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  2. I have to disagree with Natasha. I looked at the website after reading your introduction, and my first thought was how great the grid system they used was. It’s clean, professional and consistent with the brand. While endless content on the homepage doesn’t appeal to me, it’s definitely a natural process for people who surf the web. Obviously the higher the content, the more people will be inclined to click on it. This is something that I’m sure the web designers consider when deciding where to place the content.

    I’m glad you pointed out the drop down stock information. Stocks aren’t relevant in my life at the moment, but if they were, I’d appreciate this easy-to-access information that I could check each morning/evening. Thanks for sharing!

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